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J Korean Neuropsychiatr Assoc. 2010 Jul;49(4):388-392. Korean. Original Article.
Jang CK , Park S , Woo JH , Kim CY .
Department of Psychiatry, National Police Hospital, Seoul, Korea.
Department of Psychiatry, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul, Korea. cykim@amc.seoul.kr
Division of Infectious Disease, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul, Korea.
Abstract

OBJECTIVES: This study was aimed to examine whether participants of a Korean candlelight rally had correct medical information about human mad cow disease and rational attitudes about imported U.S. beef in relation to human mad cow disease. METHODS: A total of 393 face-to-face interviews were conducted, and subjects completed questions about prevalence of senile dementia and human mad cow disease in U.S. and whether they will eat U.S. beef even if no cases of human mad cow disease occurred in the U.S. or if the chance of being affected with human mad cow disease was lower than dying in a plane crash. RESULTS: Correct answer rates to the questions about prevalence of senile dementia and human mad cow disease were 28.2% and 36.1%, respectively. A majority of respondents answered that they would not eat U.S. beef even if there were no reported cases of human mad cow disease in the U.S. or if their chance of being affected with human mad cow disease was lower than dying in a plane crash (75.6% and 86.0%, respectively). CONCLUSION: At least 64.4% of participants had incorrect medical information about human mad cow disease, and their attitudes about imported U.S. beef may be rooted in emotion rather than fact.

Copyright © 2019. Korean Association of Medical Journal Editors.