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Korean J Pediatr. 2018 Jul;61(7):217-220. English. Original Article. https://doi.org/10.3345/kjp.2018.61.7.217
Gürsoy S , Koçkar T , Ugan Atik S , Önal Z , Önal H , Adal E .
Department of Pediatrics, Kanuni Sultan Suleyman Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey. dr.semra@hotmail.com
Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Kanuni Sultan Suleyman Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey.
Department of Pediatric Metabolic Disease, Kanuni Sultan Suleyman Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey.
Department of Pediatric Endocrinology and Metabolism, Kanuni Sultan Suleyman Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey.
Abstract

Purpose

Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is a chronic and immune-mediated disease, which is characterized by the progressive destruction of pancreatic beta cells. T1DM precipitates in genetically susceptible individuals through environmental factors. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the impact of autoimmunity and intestinal colonization of Candida albicans on the development of T1DM.

Methods

Forty-two patients newly diagnosed with T1DM and 42 healthy subjects were included in this monocentric study. The basic and clinical characteristics of the patients were recorded. T1DM-, thyroid-, and celiac-associated antibodies were evaluated. Stool cultures for C. albicans were performed to assess whether or not gut integrity was impaired in patients with T1DM.

Results

The evaluation of T1DM- and thyroid-associated antibodies showed that the prevalences of islet cell antibodies and antithyroperoxidase positivity were higher in the study patients than in the patients in the control group. Furthermore, the direct examination and culture of fresh stool samples revealed that 50% of the patients with T1DM and 23.8% of the control subjects had fungi (C. albicans).

Conclusion

Through this study, we suggest that the presence of intestinal C. albicans colonization at the time of the diagnosis of T1DM may indicate impairment of normal intestinal microbiota. We also suggest that there may be a tendency of T1DM in patients with a high prevalence of intestinal C. albicans.

Copyright © 2019. Korean Association of Medical Journal Editors.