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Korean J Pediatr. 2015 Sep;58(9):330-335. English. Original Article. https://doi.org/10.3345/kjp.2015.58.9.330
Kim NY , Kim GR , Kim JH , Baek JH , Yoon JW , Jee HM , Baek HS , Jung YH , Choi SH , Kim KE , Shin YH , Yum HY , Han MY , Kim KE .
Department of Pediatrics, CHA Bundang Medical Center, Seongnam, Korea.
Department of Pediatrics, Hallym University Dongtan Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Hwaseong, Korea.
Department of Pediatrics, Myongji Hospital, Goyang, Korea.
Department of Pediatrics, CHA University School of Medicine, Pocheon, Korea. epirubicin13@gmail.com
Department of Pediatrics, Hallym University Kangdong Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
Department of Pediatrics, Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, Kyung Hee University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
Department of Pediatrics, CHA Gangnam Medical Center, Seoul, Korea.
Department of Medicine, The Graduate School, Yonsei University, Seoul, Korea.
Department of Pediatrics, Seoul Medical Center, Seoul, Korea.
Department of Pediatrics, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
Abstract

PURPOSE: The clinical interpretation of children sensitized to allergens is challenging, particularly in children with food allergies. We aimed to examine clinical differences between children with monosensitization and those with polysensitization to common food allergens and to determine risk factors for polysensitization in young children <10 years of age with immediate-type food allergies. METHODS: The study included children <10 years of age with signs and symptoms indicative of immediate-type food allergies. Serum total IgE level was measured, and ImmunoCAP analysis for food allergens was performed. RESULTS: The mean age of the study subjects was 1.6+/-1.6 years (75 boys and 51 girls). Thirty-eight children (30.2%) were monosensitized and 88 children (69.8%) were polysensitized. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the development of polysensitization to common food allergens was positively associated with a parental history of allergic rhinitis (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 6.28; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.78-22.13; P=0.004), season of birth (summer/fall) (aOR, 3.10; 95% CI, 1.10-8.79; P=0.033), and exclusive breastfeeding in the first 6 months of age (aOR, 3.51; 95% CI, 1.20-10.25; P=0.022). CONCLUSION: We found significant clinical differences between children with monosensitization and those with polysensitization to common food allergens and identified risk factors for the development of polysensitization in young children with immediate-type food allergies. Clinicians should consider these clinical risk factors when evaluating, counseling, treating, and monitoring young children with food allergies.

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