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J Korean Soc Pediatr Nephrol. 2002 Oct;6(2):198-208. Korean. Original Article.
Park SS , Lee JS , Kim SY .
Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine, Pusan National University, Busan, Korea. suyung@hyowon.pusan.ac.kr
Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine, Sungkyunkwan University, Masan Samsung Hospotal, Masan, Korea.
Abstract

PURPOSE: There is no scientific basis for an immunization policy for children with renal disease who have increased risk of infection in Korea. As an initial step in approaching this problem, this survey of pediatric nephrologists was undertaken to determine the current recommendations of practicing pediatric nephrologists. METHODS: Questionnaires were sent to the members of Korean Society of Pediatric Nephrology via mail and E-mail. The questionnaire was designed to obtain information about the immunization practice of basic vaccination schedule for nephrotic syndrome, the side effects after vaccination and the immunization practice about recommended vaccines for children with renal disease. RESULTS: Questionnaires were sent to 56 pediatric nephrologists. 35 replies were received (response rate: 62.5%). Almost of the respondents (82.8%) reported practicing at university hospital. All respondents reported modified vaccination schedule. 65.7% of the respondents immunized nephrotic children with live vaccines some time later after discontinuation of corticosteroids treatment and 57.1% of respondents immunized them with killed vaccines during medication of low doses of corticosteroids. Respondents experienced relapse of nephrotic syndrome after vaccination are nine, lack of vaccine efficacy are three and infection by organisms of live vaccines are two. 71.4% of respondents reported vaccinating children with renal disease for hepatitis B, pneumococcus and influenza during medication of low doses of corticosteroids. But There is few difference of the rates of respondents vaccinating them for Hemophilus influenzae type b between during medication of low doses of corticosteroids and after discontinuation of corticosteroids treatment (45.7% vs 42.9%). Almost of respondents reported vaccinating renal failure children without immunosuppression for hepatitis B, pneumococcus, influenza and H. influenzae type b (54.3-77.1%). CONCLUSION: Pediatric nephrologists practiced modifying vaccination schedules for children with renal disease in Korea and there was variation according to the progression of disease and the doses of corticosteroids. It is necessary to establish the immunization guideline for children with renal disease through the prospective studies.

Copyright © 2019. Korean Association of Medical Journal Editors.