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Korean J Occup Environ Med. 2011 Dec;23(4):360-370. Korean. Original Article. https://doi.org/10.35371/kjoem.2011.23.4.360
Kim DH , Kang DM , Kim JE , Kim YK , Sul JK , Choy S .
Department of Preventive and Occupational Medicine, School of Medicine, Pusan National University, Korea.
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital, Korea. kangdm@pusan.ac.kr
Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital Research Institute for Convergence of Biomedical Science and Technology, Korea.
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Kosin University, Korea.
Abstract

OBJECTIVES: This study aims to find differences that reflect the magnitude of health disparities in wage workers in Korea according to income index(personal income, household income, equivalized income) by gender. METHODS: Data was obtained from the 11th wave of Korean Labor and Income Panel Survey in 2008. This study analyzed 4,205 subjects(2,570 males and 1,635 females) aged 19-65 years. To compare the health effects of each income index by gender, unconditional multiple logistic regression, health-related behaviors, and working conditions were used. The unconditional multiple logistic regression was adjusted by socio-demographic characteristics. All statistics were estimated using SAS survey procedures. RESULTS: According to unconditional multiple logistic regression, significant differences in ORs between men and women were observed in this study for those wage workers who self-rated their health status to be poor. This was consistent between each income index. Men had an OR of 1.76 (95% CI, 1.28~2.43) by personal income, 1.70 (95%CI, 1.25~2.32) by household income and 1.69 (95% CI, 1.23~2.31) by equivalized income. Women had an 2.09 (95% CI, 1.47~2.97) by household income and OR of 1.95 (95% CI, 1.36~2.79) by equivalized income, but personal income did not have a significant effect on OR for women. CONCLUSIONS: The study of occupational and environmental medicine should consider that each income index has different effects on the self-rated health status according to gender. Household income index and equivalized income index would represent a health status for women.

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