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Korean J Occup Environ Med. 2007 Jun;19(2):105-114. Korean. Original Article. https://doi.org/10.35371/kjoem.2007.19.2.105
Hwang CK , Koh SB , Chang SJ , Park CY , Cha BS , Hyun SJ , Park JH , Lee KM , Cha KT , Park WJ , Jhun HJ .
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Hangang Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University, Korea.
Department of Preventive Medicine and Institute of Occupational Medicine, Wonju College of Medicine, Yonsei University, Korea. kohhj@yonsei.ac.kr
National Health Insurance Corporation, Korea.
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, College of Medicine, Korea University, Korea.
Abstract

OBJECTIVES: This prospective study was performed to investigate the association between occupational stress and the development of cerebrovascular and cardiovascular diseases. METHODS: A total of 8,429 employees were selected from a nationwide sample, proportional to both the Korean Standard Industrial Classification and the Korean Standard Occupational Classification. A structured self-reported questionnaire was used to access the demographic and socioeconomic characteristics, health behavior and work related characteristics. 43-items of the full version of Korean Occupational Stress Scale (KOSS) were used to access the participants occupational stress. New cases of hospitalization due to cerebrovascular and cardiovascular diseases were evaluated using medical utilization files received from the National Health Insurance Corporation for the period of March 2004 to December 2005. A logistic regression analysis was performed to investigate the association between occupational stress and cerebrovascular and cardiovascular diseases. RESULTS: 43 new cases of hospitalization due to cerebrovascular and cardiovascular diseases were found. According to the results of the logistic regression analysis, job stressors were related with circulatory diseases after adjustment for gender, age, number of workers, employment type, shift work, smoking, alcohol intake, and regular exercise. Of the 8 subscales, insufficient job control (Adj. RR 2.802; 95% CI 1.038-7.564) and occupational climate (Adj. RR 2.365; 95% CI 1.087~5.143) were significantly associated with cerebrovascular and cardiovascular diseases. However, no significant relationships were found between the 6 KOSS subscales and cerebrovascular and cardiovascular diseases. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the short-term follow-up of about two years, the KOSS subscales of insufficient job control and occupational climate were significantly associated with cerebrovascular and cardiovascular diseases.

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