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Korean J Occup Environ Med. 2004 Mar;16(1):92-102. Korean. Original Article. https://doi.org/10.35371/kjoem.2004.16.1.92
Heo KH , Han YS , Jung HS , Koo JW .
Industrial Safety & Health Research Institute, KOSHA, Korea.
Department of Preventive Medicine, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Korea. jwkoo@catholic.ac.kr
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the complaint rates of musculoskeletal symptoms and investigated the related factors of musculoskeletal symptoms in the caddies. METHODS: For 316 caddies working at 6 regular golf courses, we used the self-recording questionnaires to examine general characteristics, job stress factors, subjective musculoskeletal symptoms designed by NIOSH, working environments, and working contents. RESULTS: The complaint rates of musculoskeletal symptoms according to the musculoskeletal criteria of NIOSH were 41.8% in the leg/knee/ankle/foot, 35.8% in the shoulder, 35.8% in the upper back/lower back, 28.8% in the neck, and 28.5% in the arm/wrist/fingers. Important factors affecting musculoskeletal symptoms were daily working hours during the high-demand season in all anatomical sites except the arm/wrist/fingers. Other related factors were degrees of winding and inclined in the golf courses, violent language and violence of customers, inability to regulate the velocity and work load control, heavy physical burden, instability of employment, and possibility of unemployment according to the specialty of caddies. As a results of multivariate logistic regression analysis, musculoskeletal symptoms of the neck, shoulders, back/lower back and leg/knee/ankle/foot were significantly influenced by working time over 12 hours in the high-demand season, and symptoms of the arm/wrist/fingers by low decision latitude (P<0.05). CONCLUSIONS: The complaint rates of musculoskeletal symptoms in the caddies were affected by working time over 12 hours and low decision latitude against excessively high psychological job demand.

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