Journal Browser Advanced Search Help
Journal Browser Advanced search HELP
Korean J Occup Environ Med. 2004 Mar;16(1):37-47. Korean. Original Article. https://doi.org/10.35371/kjoem.2004.16.1.37
Jeong WC , Kwon HJ , Ha M , Roh SC , Kwon BS , Hyun JG , Lee SJ , Lee JM , Kwon JY , Kim JS , Baek NJ , Lee H , Lee KW , Lee SK .
Department of Occupational Medicine, College of Medicine, Dankook University, Korea.
Department of Preventive Medicine, College of Medicine, Dankook University, Korea. hojang@dku.edu
Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, College of Medicine, Dankook University, Korea.
Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, College of Medicine, Dongkook Univeristy, Korea.
Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Korea.
Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, College of Medicine, Seoul national University, Korea.
Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, College of Medicine, Soonchunhayng University, Korea.
Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, College of Medicine, Donga University, Korea.
Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, College of Medicine, Jeonnam National University, Korea.
Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is one of the most important work related musculo-skeletal diseases in Korea. However, there are few epidemiologic studies on the work-related CTS (WR-CTS). This study aimed to investigate the epidemiologic characteristics of WR-CTS in Korea. METHODS: Data obtained from the"CTS Surveillance System". Physician case-reports in the surveillance were used to document patterns of WR-CTS by age, gender, occupation, sign, symptom, working history. RESULTS: Six hundred and seventy-two cases of WR-CTS were ascertained. of which 314 with complete information on occupational history were analyzed. It has been estimated that as many as 72% of all CTS cases are work-related. The highest proportion of WR-CTS was observed in 'elementary occupation workers', followed by 'skilled agricultural, forestry and fishery workers'. The distributions of WR-CTS cases were similar with respect to age, obesity, and past medical history. The proportion of WR-CTS was higher in females. There was no significant difference in physical examination findings between WR-CTS and non WR-CTS cases. Repetitive work and the inappropriate hand posture seemed to be the risks for WR-CTS. CONCLUSION: WR-CTS is a significant public health problem. The CTS surveillance system is quite useful to elucidate the characteristics of WR-CTS, but it remains of limited use in targeting specific industries and occupations for intervention.

Copyright © 2019. Korean Association of Medical Journal Editors.