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Korean J Fam Med. 2018 Mar;39(2):90-95. English. Original Article. https://doi.org/10.4082/kjfm.2018.39.2.90
Park JK , Lee S , Lee JE , Han KD , Kim JH , Yoon JH , Park SW , Kim YH , Cho KH .
Department of Family Medicine, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. chokh@korea.ac.kr, mrchir@naver.com
Department of Medical Statistics, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea.
Abstract

Background

Globally, smoking is one of the biggest challenges in public health and is a known cause of several important diseases. Influenza is preventable via annual vaccination, which is the most effective and cost-beneficial method of prevention. However, subjects who smoke have some unhealthy behaviours such as alcohol, low physical activity, and low vaccination rate. In this study, we analyzed the relationship between smoking status and factors potentially related to the influenza vaccination coverage rate in the South Korean adult population.

Methods

The study included 13,565 participants aged >19 years, from 2010 to 2012 from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data. Univariate analyses were conducted to examine the association between influenza coverage rate and related factors. Multivariate analysis was obtained after adjusting for variables that were statistically significant.

Results

The overall vaccination rate was 27.3% (n=3,703). Older individuals (P < 0.0001), women (P < 0.0001), non-smokers (P < 0.0001), light alcohol drinkers (P < 0.0001), the unemployed (P < 0.0001), and subjects with diabetes mellitus (P < 0.0001), hypercholesterolemia (P < 0.0001), and metabolic syndrome (P < 0.0001) had higher influenza vaccination coverage than the others. In multivariate analyses, current smokers and heavy smokers showed lower vaccination rates (odds ratio, 0.734; 95% confidence interval, 0.63–0.854).

Conclusion

In the current study, smokers and individuals with inadequate health-promoting behaviors had lower vaccination rates than the others did.

Copyright © 2019. Korean Association of Medical Journal Editors.