Korean J Fam Med.  2020 Nov;41(6):404-411. 10.4082/kjfm.19.0073.

Association between Relative Handgrip Strength and Dyslipidemia in Korean Adults: Findings of the 2014–2015 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

Affiliations
  • 1Department of Family Medicine, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Yangsan, Korea
  • 2Pusan National University Medical Research Institute, Yangsan, Korea
  • 3Department of Family Medicine, Pusan National University Hospital, Busan, Korea
  • 4Busan Tobacco Control Center, Pusan National University Hospital, Busan, Korea
  • 5Family Medicine Clinic, Obesity, Metabolism and Nutrition Center and Research Institute of Convergence of Biomedical Science and Technology, Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital, Yangsan, Korea
  • 6Department of Medical Education, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Yangsan, Korea

Abstract

Background
Grip strength is a convenient method to measure muscle strength. Recently, relative handgrip strength (HGS) was recommended as a clinical predictor of metabolic health and disease, such as dyslipidemia, which is considered a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. The purpose of this study was to characterize the association between relative HGS and dyslipidemia.
Methods
We included 6,027 adults (2,934 men, 3,093 women) aged 30–69 years who participated in the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey in 2014 and 2015. Relative HGS was obtained by dividing the HGS by body mass index. Complex sampling analysis was conducted to compare the general characteristics of participants according to the quartiles of relative HGS. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine the association between quartiles of relative HGS and dyslipidemia.
Results
After adjustment for age, prevalence of diabetes mellitus, prevalence of hypertension, alcohol consumption, smoking status, exercise, income, and education level, relative HGS was inversely associated with dyslipidemia in both men and women. In multivariable logistic regression analysis, the odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) for dyslipidemia in quartiles 1, 2, and 3 relative to quartile 4 were 1.36 (1.00–1.83), 1.29 (0.98–1.70), 1.23 (0.95– 1.60) in men and 1.81 (1.30–2.50), 1.81 (1.32–2.47), 1.39 (1.07–1.81) in women, respectively.
Conclusion
Relative HGS was inversely associated with dyslipidemia risk in Korean adults. Muscle-strengthening exercise is recommended to enhance health outcomes.

Keyword

Hand Strength; Muscle Strength; Dyslipidemias; Metabolic Syndrome
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