Arch Craniofac Surg.  2020 Apr;21(2):92-98. 10.7181/acfs.2020.00038.

The efficacy of dermofat grafts from the groin forcorrection of acquired facial deformities

Affiliations
  • 1Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Chosun University College of Medicine, Gwangju, Korea
  • 2Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Chosun University Graduate School of Medicine, Gwangju, Korea

Abstract

Background
Posttraumatic acquired facial deformities require surgical treatment, with options including scar revision, fat grafts, implant insertion, and flap coverage. However, each technique has specific advantages and disadvantages.
Methods
From 2016 to 2018, 13 patients (eight with scar contracture and five with a depressed scar) were treated using dermofat grafts from the groin. The harvested dermofat was then inserted into the undermined dead space after the contracture was released, and a bolster suture was done for fixation considering the patient’s contour and asymmetry. A modified version of the Vancouver Scar Scale and satisfaction survey were used to compare deformity improvements before and after surgery.
Results
In most cases, effective volume correction and an aesthetically satisfactory contour were maintained well after dermofat grafting, without any major complications. In some cases, however, lipolysis proceeded rapidly when inflammation and infection were not completely eliminated. A significant difference was found in the modified Vancouver Scar Scale before and after surgery, with a p-value of 0.001. The average score on the satisfaction survey was 17.07 out of 20 points.
Conclusion
A dermofat graft with the groin as the donor site can be considered as an effective surgical option that is the simplest and most cost-effective method for the treatment of acquired facial deformities with scar contracture.

Keyword

Autografts; Face; Reconstructive surgical procedures; Treatment outcome
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