Clin Exp Emerg Med.  2019 Sep;6(3):242-249. 10.15441/ceem.18.057.

Effects of cholesterol levels on outcomes of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: a cross-sectional study

Affiliations
  • 1Department of Emergency Medicine, Wonkwang University Sanbon Hospital, Gunpo, Korea.
  • 2Department of Emergency Medicine, Wonkwang University Sanbon Hospital, Wonkwang University School of Medicine, Gunpo, Korea. great@wku.ac.kr
  • 3Department of Emergency Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
  • 4Laboratory of Emergency Medical Services, Seoul National University Hospital Biomedical Research Institute, Seoul, Korea.
  • 5Mibyeong Research Center, Korea Institute of Oriental Medicine, Daejeon, Korea.

Abstract


OBJECTIVE
High cholesterol level is a risk factor for coronary artery disease, and coronary artery disease is a major risk factor for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). However, the effect of cholesterol level on outcomes of OHCA has been poorly studied. This study aimed to determine the effect of cholesterol level on outcomes of OHCA.
METHODS
This cross-sectional study used the CAPTURES (Cardiac Arrest Pursuit Trial with Unique Registration and Epidemiologic Surveillance) project database in Korea. Multivariable conditional logistic regression analysis was performed to estimate the effect of cholesterol level on outcomes in OHCA.
RESULTS
In all, 584 cases of OHCA were analyzed; those with cholesterol levels <120 mg/dL were classified as having low total cholesterol (TC) (n=197), those with levels ranging from 120-199 mg/dL as middle TC (n=322), and those with ≥200 mg/dL as high TC (n=65). Compared to low TC, more patients with middle TC and high TC survived to discharge (9.1% vs. 22.0% and 26.2%, respectively, P=0.001). The good cerebral performance category also increased in that order (4.1 % vs. 14.6% and 23.1%, respectively, P≤0.001). Comparing middle TC and high TC with low TC, adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) were 1.97 (1.06 to 3.64) and 2.53 (1.08 to 5.92) for survival to discharge, respectively, and 2.53 (1.07 to 5.98) and 4.73 (1.63 to 13.71) for good neurological recovery, respectively.
CONCLUSION
Higher cholesterol is associated with better outcomes in OHCA; cholesterol level is a good predictor of outcomes of OHCA.

Keyword

Heart arrest; Cholesterol; Outcome; Cardiac Arrest Pursuit Trial with Unique Registration and Epidemiologic Surveillance

MeSH Terms

Cholesterol*
Coronary Artery Disease
Cross-Sectional Studies*
Heart Arrest
Humans
Korea
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio
Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest*
Risk Factors
Cholesterol
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