Saf Health Work.  2019 Sep;10(3):321-326. 10.1016/j.shaw.2019.06.002.

The Interaction of Cognitive Interference, Standing Surface, and Fatigue on Lower Extremity Muscle Activity

Affiliations
  • 1Northern Illinois University, Department of Kinesiology and Physical Education, Dekalb, IL, United States. cmhill1@go.olemiss.edu
  • 2Mississippi State University, Department of Industrial and System Engineering, Mississippi State, MS, United States.
  • 3Mississippi State University, Department of Kinesiology, Mississippi State, MS, United States.
  • 4University of West Florida, Department of Exercise Science and Community Health, Pensacola, FL, United States.
  • 5Troy University, Department of Kinesiology and Health Promotion, Troy, AL, United States.
  • 6Auburn University, Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, Auburn, AL, United States.

Abstract

BACKGROUND
Performing cognitive tasks and muscular fatigue have been shown to increase muscle activity of the lower extremity during quiet standing. A common intervention to reduce muscular fatigue is to provide a softer shoe-surface interface. However, little is known regarding how muscle activity is affected by softer shoe-surface interfaces during static standing. The purpose of this study was to assess lower extremity muscular activity during erect standing on three different standing surfaces, before and after an acute workload and during cognitive tasks.
METHODS
Surface electromyography was collected on ankle dorsiflexors and plantarflexors, and knee flexors and extensors of fifteen male participants. Dependent electromyography variables of mean, peak, root mean square, and cocontraction index were calculated and analyzed with a 2 Ã— 2 Ã— 3 within-subject repeated measures analysis of variance.
RESULTS
Pre-workload muscle activity did not differ between surfaces and cognitive task conditions. However, greater muscle activity during post-workload balance assessment was found, specifically during the cognitive task. Cognitive task errors did not differ between surface and workload.
CONCLUSIONS
The cognitive task after workload increased lower extremity muscular activity compared to quite standing, irrespective of the surface condition, suggesting an increased demand was placed on the postural control system as the result of both fatigue and cognitive task.

Keyword

Anti-fatigue; Dual-task; Postural control; Standing surface

MeSH Terms

Ankle
Electromyography
Fatigue*
Humans
Knee
Lower Extremity*
Male
Muscle Fatigue
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