Ann Clin Neurophysiol.  2018 Jul;20(2):66-70. 10.14253/acn.2018.20.2.66.

Potential risks of nerve conduction studies and needle electromyography

Affiliations
  • 1Department of Neurology, Seoul Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
  • 2Department of Neurology, Chung-Ang University Hospital, Chung-Ang University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
  • 3Department of Neurology, Seoul Medical Center, Seoul, Korea.
  • 4Department of Neurology, Soonchunhyang University Hospital Cheonan, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Cheonan, Korea.
  • 5Department of Neurology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
  • 6Department of Neurology, Hallym University Dongtan Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Hwaseong, Korea.
  • 7Department of Neurology, Mokdong Hospital, Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
  • 8Department of Neurology, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

Abstract

Electrodiagnostic studies such as nerve conduction studies (NCS) and needle electromyography (EMG) provide important and complementary information for evaluating patients with suspected neuromuscular disorders. NCS and needle EMG are reasonably safe diagnostic investigations and are generally associated with only mild transient discomfort when performed by experienced physicians. However, there is the risk of complications in some patients, because NCS involve the administration of electric current and EMG involves inserting a needle percutaneously into muscle tissue. This article reviews the potential risks of NCS and needle EMG.

Keyword

Nerve conduction studies; Complications; Electrodiagnosis; Safety

MeSH Terms

Electrodiagnosis
Electromyography*
Humans
Needles*
Neural Conduction*
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