Korean J Parasitol.  2019 Jun;57(3):295-298. 10.3347/kjp.2019.57.3.295.

An Autochthonous Human Case of Fasciolopsiasis in Nepal

Affiliations
  • 1Department of Microbiology, Tribhuvan University Teaching Hospital, Institute of Medicine, Kathmandu, Nepal.
  • 2Department of Medicine (Division of Infectious Disease), Medanta, The Medicity, Gurugram, Haryana, India.
  • 3University of Cagliari-Faculty of Medicine and Surgery, Cagliari, Italy.
  • 4Area de Parasitología, Departamento de Farmacia, Tecnología Farmacéutica y Parasitología, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad de Valencia, Av. Vicent Andrés Estellés s/n, 46100 Burjassot, Valencia, Spain. rafael.toledo@uv.es

Abstract

Fasciolopsiasis is rarely known as the parasitic disease in Nepal. Herein, we report a case of fasciolopsiasis in a 22-year-old man who was admitted in the hospital with abdominal pain, distension and loss of appetite for a month. He had previously diagnosed with acute viral hepatitis but, his abdominal pain was not resolving despite improvement in his liver function and general condition. During endoscopy an adult digenean worm was seen in the first part of the duodenum. After isolation, the worm was identified morphologically as Fasciolopsis buski. Microscogic examination of the patient's stool revealed eggs with a morphology consistent with F. buski. Eggs were yellow-brown, ellipsoidal, unembmbryonated, operculated, filled with yolk cells, with thin shell and ranging 118-130 μm in length and 60-69 μm in width. The abdominal pain of the patient was resolved after treatment with praziquantel. By the present study, it was confirmed for the first time that fasciolopsiasis is indigenously transmitted in Nepal. Accordingly, the epidemiological studies in humans and reservoir host animals should be performed intensively in near future.

Keyword

Fasciolopsis buski; fasciolopsiasis; abdominal pain; hepatitis; Nepal

MeSH Terms

Abdominal Pain
Adult
Animals
Appetite
Duodenum
Eggs
Endoscopy
Epidemiologic Studies
Fasciolidae
Hepatitis
Humans*
Liver
Nepal*
Ovum
Parasitic Diseases
Praziquantel
Trematode Infections*
Young Adult
Praziquantel
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