Korean J Otorhinolaryngol-Head Neck Surg.  2018 Aug;61(8):403-407. 10.3342/kjorl-hns.2017.00689.

Clinical Usefulness of Video Head Impulse Test-Comparison of Bithermal Caloric Test and Bedside Head Impulse Test

Affiliations
  • 1Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Inha University College of Medicine, Incheon, Korea. stedman@inha.ac.kr
  • 2Soree Ear Clinic, Seoul, Korea.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES
Video head impulse test system (vHIT) is an easy-to-use test and there are numerous studies showing its efficacy. The aim of the study was to evaluate the clinical usefulness of vHIT as an initial test in determining vestibular hypofunction in patients with dizziness.
SUBJECTS AND METHOD
The study recruited 103 outpatients who visited our ear clinic with dizziness. We performed both bedside head impulse test (bHIT), vHIT and bithermal caloric tests for 103 patients. Both bHIT and vHIT were consecutively performed in each subject on the same day by the same examiner.
RESULTS
The sensitivity of bHIT and vHIT was determined based on the bithermal caloric test results, which showed that vHIT was more sensitive than bHIT. There was a significant negative correlation between vHIT gain and canal paresis (p < 0.05). Results of some patients indicated dissociation between vHIT and caloric test.
CONCLUSION
T here is a significant correlation between the results of vHIT and caloric test. Although vHIT does not replace the caloric test, it would be useful to evaluate the initial vestibular loss in patients with dizziness.

Keyword

Caloric test; Canal paresis; Corrective saccade; Dizziness; Video head impulse test

MeSH Terms

Caloric Tests*
Dizziness
Ear
Head Impulse Test*
Head*
Humans
Methods
Outpatients
Paresis
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