J Stroke.  2017 Sep;19(3):295-303. 10.5853/jos.2017.00045.

Effects of Temperature and Pressure on Acute Stroke Incidence Assessed Using a Korean Nationwide Insurance Database

Affiliations
  • 1Department of Neurology, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Anyang, Korea.
  • 2Department of Neurology, Seoul Metropolitan Government-Seoul National University Boramae Medical Center, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. hmkwon@snu.ac.kr
  • 3Department of Neurology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam, Korea.
  • 4Department of Biostatistics, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
  • 5Department of Neurology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE
Many studies have evaluated the association between weather and stroke, with variable conclusions. Herein we determined the relationships between daily meteorological parameters and acute stroke incidence in South Korea.
METHODS
Patients with acute stroke (2,894) were identified by standard sampling of a nationwide insurance claims database from January to December 2011. We used multiple Poisson regression analyses of stroke incidence and meteorological parameters (mean temperature, diurnal temperature change, temperature differences over the preceding 24 hours, atmospheric pressure, humidity, wind speed, and physiologically equivalent temperature) to calculate the relative risk of stroke incidence associated with meteorological parameters.
RESULTS
There were no seasonal variations in the incidences of ischemic (2,176) or hemorrhagic (718) stroke. Temperature change during the day was positively correlated with ischemic stroke in men (relative risk [RR] 1.027; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.006-1.05) and older patients (≥65 years) (RR 1.031, 95% CI 1.011-1.052). Temperature differences over the preceding 24 hours had a negative correlation with all strokes (RR 0.968, 95% CI 0.941-0.996), especially among older women. Diurnal variation of atmospheric pressure was also significantly associated with the incidence of ischemic stroke (age < 65 years, RR 1.051, 95% CI 1.011-1.092; age≥65 years, RR 0.966, 95% CI 0.936-0.997).
CONCLUSIONS
Diurnal temperature change, temperature differences over the preceding 24 hours, and diurnal variation of atmospheric pressure were associated with daily stroke incidence. These findings may enhance our understanding of the relationship between stroke and weather.

Keyword

Cerebral infarction; Cerebral hemorrhage; Temperature; Atmospheric pressure; Insurance, Health

MeSH Terms

Atmospheric Pressure
Cerebral Hemorrhage
Cerebral Infarction
Female
Humans
Humidity
Incidence*
Insurance*
Insurance, Health
Korea
Male
Seasons
Stroke*
Weather
Wind
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