Osteoporos Sarcopenia.  2016 Sep;2(3):156-163. 10.1016/j.afos.2016.06.001.

Locomotive syndrome presents a risk for falls and fractures in the elderly Japanese population

Affiliations
  • 1Rehabilitation Division, Tottori University Hospital, Tottori, Japan. h.matsumoto@med.tottori-u.ac.jp
  • 2School of Health Science, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori University, Tottori, Japan.

Abstract

"Locomotive syndrome" is used to designate the condition of individuals with musculoskeletal disease who are highly likely to require nursing care. This article reviews screening, prevalence, causal and related factors, and the relationship between locomotive syndrome and falls and fractures in older adults with this syndrome. A few self-administered questionnaire tools are available to assess individuals for locomotive syndrome. Additionally, screening methods, including a physical functioning assessment, are appropriate for detailed discrimination of locomotive syndrome. The prevalence of locomotive syndrome is significantly higher in women than in men, and tends to increase markedly from 70 years of age. More severe locomotive syndrome is related to knee pain, osteoporosis, sarcopenia, and lumbar disease. The incidence of falling in locomotive syndrome is higher than the incidence for the older population in general. Locomotive training including squats and a unipedal standing exercise has been recommending to prevent locomotive syndrome. This training improves muscle strength and balance function for older people who have a risk for locomotive syndrome.

Keyword

Locomotive syndrome; Fall; Fractures

MeSH Terms

Accidental Falls*
Adult
Aged*
Asian Continental Ancestry Group*
Discrimination (Psychology)
Female
Humans
Incidence
Knee
Male
Mass Screening
Muscle Strength
Musculoskeletal Diseases
Nursing Care
Osteoporosis
Prevalence
Sarcopenia
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