Pediatr Emerg Med J.  2016 Dec;3(2):43-47. 10.22470/pemj.2016.3.2.43.

Underestimated risks of rare-earth magnet ingestion in children: when does it need surgery?

Affiliations
  • 1Department of Surgery, Dong-A University College of Medicine, Busan, Korea. d011029@naver.com

Abstract

This review discusses an underestimated risk of rare-earthmagnet (henceforth, magnet) ingestion in children and its surgical indication. Due to the ubiquity of magnets, the incidence of magnet ingestion has rapidly increased. While most foreign body ingestions show spontaneous passage, multiple magnet ingestion requires surgery in 30%-70% of the cases. Multiple magnets can attract each other across the bowel wall, leading to pressure necrosis, and subsequently, fistula, perforation, obstruction or volvulus. After recognizing magnet ingestion, the number of magnets should be checked using radiographs. In case of multiple magnet ingestion, surgery should be promptly considered.

Keyword

Child; Foreign Bodies; Gastrointestinal Tract; General Surgery; Magnets; Neodymium

MeSH Terms

Child*
Eating*
Fistula
Foreign Bodies
Gastrointestinal Tract
Humans
Incidence
Intestinal Volvulus
Necrosis
Neodymium
Neodymium
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