Korean J Occup Environ Med.  2011 Jun;23(2):213-224.

Job Stress and Self-perceived Fatigue in Korean Farmers

Affiliations
  • 1Department of Preventive Medicine, Institute of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Wonju College of Medicine, Yonsei University, Korea. chang0343@yonsei.ac.kr
  • 2Department of Preventive and Occupational Medicine, School of Medicine, Pusan National University, Korea.
  • 3Korean Women's Institute, Ewha Womans University, Korea.
  • 4Department of Preventive Medicine, Industrial Medical Center, The Catholic University of Korea, Korea.
  • 5Graduate School of Public Health, Yonsei University, Korea.
  • 6National Academy of Agricultural Science, Rural Development Administration, Korea.
  • 7Korean Health Promotion Foundation, Korea.

Abstract


OBJECTIVES
A growing body of research has documented that job stress has a pivotal role in developing adverse health outcomes. However, little is known about the relationship between farmers' job stress and health outcomes. This study was undertaken to identify the relationship between job stress and self-perceived fatigue in Korean farmers.
METHODS
A total of 526 Korean farmers were asked to participate in this study. A self-administered questionnaire was used to assess the participants' general characteristics, job stress and self-perceived fatigue. Job stress was measured using a forty-eight item Farm Stressor Inventory (FSI), and the self-perceived fatigue was estimated by Multidimensional Fatigue Scale (MFS). Binary logistic regression analysis was conducted to examine the relationship between job stress and self-perceived fatigue.
RESULTS
The result showed that job stress was associated with self-perceived fatigue. For the farmers with high job stress, the risk of self-perceived fatigue was more likely to increase compared to those with low job stress. For males, labor intensity (OR, 3.88; 95% CI, 1.91~7.89), job environment (OR, 2.45; 95% CI, 1.22~4.93), social support (OR, 2.10; 95% CI, 1.07~4.13), social isolation (OR, 2.45; 95% CI, 1.15~5.60), financial problems (OR, 3.25; 95% CI, 1.53~6.91), uncertainty (OR, 2.48; 95% CI, 1.30~4.75) and health problems (OR, 5.77; 95% CI, 2.46~13.53) were associated with self-perceived fatigue. For females, job environment (OR, 2.23; 95% CI, 1.22~4.08), social isolation (OR, 2.08; 95% CI, 1.05-4.15), physical environment & weather condition (OR, 2.61; 95% CI, 1.33~5.12), financial problems (OR, 2.87; 95% CI, 1.55~5.32), uncertainty (OR, 3.65; 95% CI, 1.95~6.83) and health problems (OR, 3.38; 95% CI, 1.57~7.27) were associated with self-perceived fatigue.
CONCLUSIONS
This result suggests that farmers' job stress plays a role in the development of fatigue, and job stressors related to fatigue are slightly different according to gender.

Keyword

Agriculture; Farmer; Job stress; Fatigue

MeSH Terms

Agriculture
Fatigue
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Questionnaires
Social Isolation
Uncertainty
Weather
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