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Quantitative Analysis of Actigraphy in Sleep Research

Kim JW

Since its development in the early 70s, actigraphy has been widely used in sleep research and clinical sleep medicine as an assessment tool of sleep and sleep-wake cycles. The validation...
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Human Circadian Rhythms

Lee H, Cho CH, Kim L

A 'circadian rhythm' is a self-sustained biological rhythm (cycle) that repeats itself approximately every 24 hours. Circadian rhythms are generated by an internal clock, or pacemaker, and persist even in...
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Sleep in Borderline Personality Disorder Individuals

Lee SJ

  • KMID: 2317519
  • Sleep Med Psychophysiol.
  • 2012 Dec;19(2):59-62.
Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is characterized by identity and interpersonal problem, affective dysregulation and pervasive severe impulsivity. Although sleep disturbances are not primary symptoms of BPD, they are important aspects...
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Menstruation and Sleep

Park DH

  • KMID: 2317377
  • Sleep Med Psychophysiol.
  • 2002 Dec;9(2):81-85.
There are several factors which are more likely to have sleep disorders in fertile women with menstruation than adult men. Menstrual cycle plays an important role in them. We describe...
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The Changes of Sleep-Wake Cycle from Jet-Lag by Age

Kim L, Lee SH, Suh KY

  • KMID: 2317268
  • Sleep Med Psychophysiol.
  • 1996 Dec;3(2):18-31.
Jet-lag can be defined as the cumulative physiological and psychological effects of rapid air travel across multiple time zones. Many reports have suggested that age-related changes in sleep reflect fundamental...
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The Changes of Traveller's Sleep-Wake Cycles by Jet Lag

Lee SH, Kim L, Suh KY

  • KMID: 2317253
  • Sleep Med Psychophysiol.
  • 1995 Dec;2(2):146-155.
Jet lag can be defined as the cumulative physiological and psychological effects of rapid air travel across multiple time zone. The consequences of jet lag include fatigue, general malaise, sleep...
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