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Clinical and Radiologic Characteristics of Caudal Regression Syndrome in a 3-Year-Old Boy: Lessons from Overlooked Plain Radiographs

Kang S, Park H, Hong J

Caudal regression syndrome (CRS) is a rare neural tube defect that affects the terminal spinal segment, manifesting as neurological deficits and structural anomalies in the lower body. We report a...
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Urological Evaluation of Tethered Cord Syndrome

Park K

To describe how to perform urological evaluation in children with tethered cord syndrome (TCS). Although a common manifestation of TCS is the development of neurogenic bladder in developing children, neurosurgeons...
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Syringomyelia in the Tethered Spinal Cords

Lee JY, Kim KH, Wang KC

Cases of syringomyelia associated with spinal dysraphism are distinct from those associated with hindbrain herniation or arachnoiditis in terms of the suspected pathogenetic mechanism. The symptoms of terminal syringomyelia are...
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Junctional Neural Tube Defect

Eibach S, Pang D

Junctional neurulation represents the most recent adjunct to the well-known sequential embryological processes of primary and secondary neurulation. While its exact molecular processes, occurring at the end of primary and...
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Towards Guideline-Based Management of Tethered Cord Syndrome in Spina Bifida: A Global Health Paradigm Shift in the Era of Prenatal Surgery

Bradko V, Castillo H, Janardhan , Dahl B, Gandy K, Castillo J

An estimated 60% of the world's population lives in Asia, where the incidence of neural tube defects is high. Aware that tethered cord syndrome (TCS) is an important comorbidity, the...
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Tethered Spinal Cord with Double Spinal Lipomas

Kim MJ, Yoon SH, Cho KH, Won GS

Although lumbosacral lipoma is reported to occur in 4-8 of 100,000 patients, and 66% of lipomyelomeningoceles in young patients are accompanied by hypertrophic filum terminale, it is very rare to...
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An Evaluation of Prenatal Triple Marker Screening

Cha YJ, Yang JS, Chae SL, Park AJ

  • KMID: 2239589
  • Korean J Lab Med.
  • 2003 Jun;23(3):199-204.
BACKGROUND: Maternal serum triple marker screening has become standard in prenatal care to help identify women at risk for neural tube defects (NTDs), trisomy 21 (Down syndrome) and trisomy 18...
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Neural Tube Defect of Chick Embryos by Needle Puncture and Albumen Removal

Chung YN, Kim DH, Min KS, Lee MS

  • KMID: 2188507
  • J Korean Neurosurg Soc.
  • 1999 Oct;28(10):1418-1428.
OBJECTIVE: The animal research of embryonic teratogenesis is widely performed and the neural tube defects are also studied through various animal models. Particularly, the experimental research on chick embryos is...
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Determination of Amniotic Fluid Alpha-fetoprotein and Acetylcholinesterase for Prenatal Diagnosis of Open Neural Tube Defects

Oh BH, Lee JM, Lee KH, Kwon MS

  • KMID: 2075710
  • Korean J Obstet Gynecol.
  • 1999 Apr;42(4):759-764.
OBJECTIVE: For prenatal diagnosis of open neural tube defects [ONTDs] in pregnant women by the determination of alpha-fetoprotein [AFP] and acetylcholinesterase [AChE] in amniotic fluid [AF]. METHODS: Median values and...
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The Effect of Local Anesthetics on Neurulation of Early Chick Embryos

Kim DH, Kim YG

  • KMID: 1673419
  • J Korean Neurosurg Soc.
  • 1990 May;19(5):672-680.
Chick embryos have been used widely as model systems for studies in experimental embryology and teratology. Especially early chick embryos are very useful for studies of neural tube defects. Local...
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